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Nether Whitacre Cricket Club

 Cow Pats and Cricket Bats by Maurice Barnett ©.

 Dedicated to Arthur Luckett.


This history is taken from the book by Maurice Barnett which covers 100 years of Nether Whitacre Cricket Club. The 1980's section was added by Steve Taylor and the subsequent coverage has been added by Tony Knight in conjunction with the current committee. The club is grateful to Maurice for giving his permission to publish his text online. The book was first produced to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Club's official formation in 1887. The contents of this book remain the copyright of Maurice Barnett and Nether Whitacre Cricket Club.

 

Chapters: [Introduction] [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [Appendix]


Nether Whitacre Cricket Club c 1903

Back Row. Potter, Fred Birch, J Houghton, Frank Birch, Powell, Hill, C Dale, T Birch, Edmonds, Ted Holl, Sid Birch, L Welsh

Middle Row. Shingler, Tom Harrison, Swain, Rev. H E Metcalfe, W H Collins, Walter Birch, B Leighton

Front Row. P Welch, Powell, Rafe Affleck, B Jeromes, Jack Affleck, Whitehouse

 

The 1987 Committee would like to express their thanks to Maurice Barrett for all his hard work in researching and producing this book and to Steve Taylor for his assistance in the chapter "Rapid Progress".

The Committee would also like to thank our sponsors and Vice-Presidents for their support over recent years and the following people for their financial support in producing this book.

Ian Black, Peter Connell, David Greaves, Paul Greaves, Darren McCarthy, Philip Murphy, Neil Robinson,
Steve Taylor, Mr J G Taylor, Mr H Whitehead.

 

CONTENTS

 Introduction  From Sorbo to Cork and then Real Leather
 Chapter 1   Beginnings
 Chapter 2 Halcyon Days 1908-1914
 Chapter 3 Kaiser Stopped Play
 Chapter 4 A Fresh Guard into the Twenties
 Chapter 5 The Thirties-Personal Involvement
 Chapter 6 Hitler Stopped Play
 Chapter 7 After the War Was Over- Back to the Ball
 Chapter 8 The Major and Eddie
 Chapter 9 The Fifties-Our Bowlers on Top
 Chapter 10 The Sixties-Trophy Time
 Chapter 11 The Seventies- Old Players Fade Away and New Recruits Arrive
 Chapter 12 Rapid Progress-1976-1986
 Chapter 13 Onward and Into The Nineties
 Chapter 14 The Late Nineties - A New Millennium-A Fresh Challenge-A Different Era
 Appendix  Explanation of Some Terms Used





Introduction

It all started for me in my grandma's back garden at Water Orton, when my Uncle Albert (who was good with wood) made me my first cricket bat, and my Uncle will gave me a sorbo ball.

This is when the seeds of my love of cricket were sown and where I broke my first kitchen window.

These seeds were nurtured at school, watered in Walley's field "the other side" of the Railway Bridge, when we graduated to bats which would stand up to a cork ball (which is more than we could say for our shins) and finally blossomed for forty five more enjoyable years in the field opposite "The Swan", where real cricket is played -leather balls and all-the home of Nether Whitacre Cricket Club.

Now, sixty years or so later I am left with the fruits of many memories, both my own and of a variety of former players and followers who have talked to me in my youth and later, about our local game.

Some of these recollections, thoughts, observations and anecdotes are related in this book in a humble and I regret, somewhat sketchy attempt to celebrate our first Century by looking back down the long vista of bygone years.

It is due to many who have worked for this club for so long and more important now, to the credit of the present members, that this Club remains and flourishes in the Village, not only for the pleasure of its players, but also for the enjoyment of everyone who cares to participate, either as an active supporter or an interested spectator.

You will always be cordially welcomed to our ground.

Maurice Barnett
1987


The Author, Maurice Barnett (Dec 2000) aged 85

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