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Nether Whitacre Cricket Club

 Cow Pats and Cricket Bats by Maurice Barnett ©.

Chapter Six

Chapters: [Introduction] [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [Appendix]

Hitler Stopped Play

 

Our secretary in 1939 was Les Arnold and it fell to him to send the following letter to Mr Hughan dated 28.4.1940:-

"Dear Sir,

At the Annual General Meeting of the Nether Whitacre Cricket Club it was decided that the activities of the Club be suspended for the duration of the war and we wish to leave the field entirely in your hands.

On behalf of the members of the Club we would like to thank you very much for your kindness in placing the ground at our disposal in the past years and hope to have your services of the field after the war."


Accordingly, once more the cricket field was left to the ruminations of the cows (Fred Dade's this time), the fattening of the sheep and as a bulls eye for one of Adolf's random bombs.

Incidentally, the bomb was a relatively small one, but thankfully just missed the neighbouring house by a few yards. We filled the crater in after the war, but obviously didn't make a good job of it - we must have put the sub-soil on the top, because the grass remained uneven and sparse right up to 1986, when the Committee of that day leveled it with loam and reseeded it. What was constantly a reminder of a 'near miss' has now finally disappeared.

Now, certain fieldsman, patrolling that area will have to think of a better excuse than a bit of rough ground, when they allow what should have been an easy single to become an undeserved four, simply because they took their eyes off the ball and did not get their body behind it. (I have been guilty of that, more than once, kidding myself the ball 'bobbled in the rough').

 

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